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Review – Coco

FILM REVIEWCOCOWith the voices of Anthony Gonzalez, Gael García Bernal, Benjamin Bratt, Alanna Ubach, Renee Victor. Written by Adrian Molina & Matthew Aldrich. Directed by Lee Unkrich, Adrian Molina. Rated PG for thematic elements. 109 minutes.

cocoposterAfter the success of “Inside Out” in 2015, Pixar’s releases have varied from the weak (“The Good Dinosaur”) to the commercially acceptable (“Cars 3”) to entertaining-but-nothing-special (“Finding Dory”). What a pleasure, then, to report that COCO finds the computer animation studio (now part of the Disney Empire) at the top of its game.

Like “The Book of Life,” a 2014 animated feature that didn’t get its due, it is a story set in Mexico during the celebrations of the Day of the Dead. Families honor and remember their ancestors and, as we see, the ancestors who are thus remembered come back to visit for the day. “Coco” tells the story of Miguel (voice of Anthony Gonzalez) who longs for the life of a musician. His problem is that his great-grandfather was a musician who walked out on the family and, as a result, music is a forbidden topic. Instead, the family is devoted to making shoes.

Miguel finds himself caught between the living and the dead when he crosses over to search for Ernesto de la Cruz (Benjamin Bratt), the greatest singer in Mexico’s history and a superstar in the afterlife as well. To avoid being trapped there, Miguel needs the blessing of his ancestors who are as against a musical career for him as his living relatives. Instead, he joins forces with Hector (Gael Garcia Bernal), a roving spirit, who is afraid that he will soon be forgotten by everyone in the living world and thus dissipate in the afterlife as well.

Miguel’s adventures are colorful and imaginative and, true to Pixar when they’re focusing on the script rather than the box office, ones that evoke an emotional response. The movie is not merely about the love of music, but the desire to be remembered and the importance of remembering. It’s a two-sided coin in which Miguel will learn the importance of both.

As always with Pixar, the visuals represent computer animation at their best, managing to evoke personalities from the skeletal remains of the dead. It’s done in a way that children should be enchanted rather than frightened, as well as providing an opportunity for parents to talk about departed family members as a way of keeping their memories alive. The film builds to an emotional tribute to such memories that brings to mind the opening sequence of another Pixar triumph, “Up.”

Some have complained that Pixar is ripping off “The Book of Life,” just as there were complaints when Pixar made “A Bug’s Life” following rival studio Dreamworks’ “Antz.” Let’s just say that the Mexican culture, and the lore connected to the Day of the Dead, are both rich enough to stand one, two, or many movies. In bringing us greater familiarity with our neighbor to the south, as well as providing an inspiring tribute to love across generations, “Coco” is one of the outstanding achievements of the year and not to be missed.•••

North Shore Movies has given this film a score of 5 out of 5.Daniel M. Kimmel is a veteran movie critic and author of a host of film-related books. His latest novel is Time on My Hands: My Misadventures in Time Travel. He lives in Somerville, Massachusetts.

About Daniel M. Kimmel

Film critic, author, lecturer.

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